Meet James Fisher

James started his journey into the safety arena in the mid-nineties when he changed career paths from the boat building industry and headed down the path of becoming a nationally accredited climbing guide. His industrial safety career started as a nationally accredited trainer and assessor through the Professional Association of Climbing Instructors. From there James managed different sites in both the aquatic and outdoor recreation industries. In 2003, he was approached to enter the industrial rope access construction arena travelling around Australia and New Zealand constructing sports stadiums, bridge inspection and other work as required. With a background in confined space and vertical rescue James came to Fire and Safety Australia to share his skill-set with both trainers and students.

James Fisher

Trainer Supervisor - QLD

What inspired you to join FSA as a trainer?
In coming from the construction and boat building industries in the late 1990’s and having seen a lot of good and not so good practices, I knew I could make a difference to the culture of safety in Australia. I look back on my career with colleague’s who have mentored myself over the years and thought it’s time to mentor the current generation and our future generations.

What do you love most about your role?
This is a hard question to answer, sharing my knowledge and skills, the variety of work situations to which I am exposed, the challenge of assisting students in difficult situations and the learning environment which we create, everyone is a student including myself.

What is the most challenging aspect of your role?
Assisting people to realise their potential and then assisting them to reach their goals and objectives can always be challenging especially in the heights environment. In each program I deliver, I strive to suit the training deliver method or style to meet the client’s requirements and the specific student needs. Being able to identify adapt and overcome issues although sometimes challenging is for me very fulfilling.

What is your proudest career achievement?
One of my most memorable career achievements was in the recreation industry. I was informed that there was a quadriplegic student attending this particular school camp. Over several weeks and lots of discussions, I went away and built specific equipment and systems to allow this student to be moved around in a sandy environment and then to be lifted to the top of a large flying fox where I was positioned and then we went down together – I was his hands and feet. At the end of a five-day camp the student approached me and said Mum and Dad have taken me around the world and we did a lot of different things. But in one week with you, I have had more fun because you made me feel involved. This is where I learnt that I could really make an impact on other people’s lives.

Do you have any safety tips for people?
Think about your family first, don’t do something that you wouldn’t want a family member to do. It’s not just yourself that’s effected it’s also them.

What do you wish you knew when you were younger?
Simple little courses like Manual Handling do make a difference. I wish someone had put me through this when I was younger so as I get older I may not have had some of the physical restraints I do now. Mum was right, sit up straight.